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/k/anteen threads will be merged  and banners updated when images aren't borked on tor.


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Post and discuss lever action rifles, shotguns, and mares leg pistols be they traditional designs for cowboy larping fun or more modern 'tacticool' configurations for applications such as hunting or not being completely defenseless in B& states 'legally' (even thought it's the local state governments that are actually breaking the law however...)
Why? Because lever gats are cool.
Replies: >>1630
Lever guns in .45 ACP seem to be an obvious choice, because you can rechamber a .45 Colt revolver simply by replacing the cylinder (or using moonclips if the design permits them), and turn a whole lot of rifle casing into .45 ACP brass simply by cutting them to size, so in theory a lever gat in that calibre would be a great companion gun. And yet, it looks like only a few small shops in the US make them by modifying .45 Colt guns.
Replies: >>1287
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>>1274
I had to check because I was under the impression that Rossi a Huezillian company made a 45acp lever action but turns out I was wrong, sadly. Maybe they used to and discontinued it? I mean such a rifle wouldn't be to hard to sell, just market it to people who already own thousands of dollars worth of Nighthawk 1911's and perhaps go as far as to have it be able to use 1911 magazines loaded by the side like a STEN gun too... Though at that point semi auto PCC's that use fuddy five mags would probably sell better now that I think about it so maybe skip the magazine compatibility for that in particular since that would ruin it's ability to be able to fit in a scabbard easily which is one of the appeals to lever gats.
Those are my thoughts on the matter.
Replies: >>1345
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>>1287
>maybe skip the magazine compatibility for that in particular since that would ruin it's ability to be able to fit in a scabbard easily which is one of the appeals to lever gats.
That is a bit new to me, but what you could try is to make the tube magazine (together with whatever mechanism this theoretical design in question uses to lift the cartridges) and insert a magazine well in its place. And then you could have a magazine well for 1911 magazines, and other one for grease gun magazines, and if you want to be really funny you should have a well that can take Thompson magazines. Including the drums.
Replies: >>1350
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>>1345
What about a rotating tube mag thing? Works for this shitpost gun.
Replies: >>1351
>>1350
I mean, if you can make it thin enough so that it is about the size of a tube magazine then it can work. You could also try something like the P90 or its inspiration:
https://inv.tux.pizza/watch?v=tAZs7GdLreI
A lever gun with a .45 ACP magazine of that type would be pretty tacticool.
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>6000-7000J out of such a tiny barrel
Holy fucking shit, imagine firing it from a lever gun with a barrel that is twice as long.  I guess a  Winchester Model 1895 made with modern steel could reliably deal with. The whole thing is 75mm long, which is about the same ballpark as most of the cartridges that gun was chambeed for.
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>>1258 (OP) 
I think a lever action gets more benefits from the scout rifle concept than a bolt action does. The long eye relief scope and both eyes open shooting takes some practice and loses it's advantages at longer ranges so it makes more sense for the effective range of common lever action cartridges. Comparing the the scout Browning and the Marlin with a can in OP's first and second images shows a couple more reasons. The scope on the Marlin needs a goofy hammer extension to clear it and is enchanted with a curse that drinks the blood of your eyebrow when you shoot high power 45-70 loads. The scout scope on the Browning can't bite you and also leaves plenty of room for a back up sight at the rear of the receiver. 
I was disappointed with low light performance of my Marlin Guide Gun with the Williams Fool-proof receiver sight so I tried putting lever-scout mount and a 2-7x32 long eye relief scope on it. Now it's my favorite rifle for creeping through the bushes. Pic related is similar.
How prevalent was the idea of using a lever rifle and a revolver chambered for the same calibre back in the day? I imagine the average frontiersman would use the rifle 99% of the time, as a pistol would be useful mostly in self-defence situations within a building or on a train. And if you will barely use the revolver then a box of ammo should last you for quite a while, therefore buying an available one that fires a different ammo would be better than going out of your way to find one in the same calibre. Although if you replace an old revolver with a new one because you feel like it, then you might as well buy it to be a companion gun. Or were there combo deals for lever-actions and revolvers back then?
Replies: >>2091 >>2437
>>2079
I feel like damn near everything a "frontiersman" of the day did was based upon
>What can I afford?
>What is available from the nearest general store?
Replies: >>2104
>>2091
Indeed, that is why I am asking if this whole companion gun idea was just marketing back then, or something more legitimate.
Replies: >>2106
>>2104
If shop owners can make a better profit from selling companion guns wouldn't it make sense that it's less of a hassle to get one of the same calliber because the guy selling the guns would much rather you buy two from him over one from him and another from a competitor?
>>2079
I've seen it referenced in early 1900s publications. I think the bigger concern isn't stocking two ammunition, it's being able to find replacement ammo in the future to avoid having a useless gun, so picking something that's absurdly common for both minimizes the issue. Even in the interwar, American hunting publications were suggesting 44-40 as round for foreign hunting trips on the explicit rationale you'd actually be able to find ammo virtually anywhere in the world. Imagine trying to find something like .44 Colt in a country that barely has civilian handguns.
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