/fit/ - Health and Fitness

Health, fitness, nutrition, and GAINZ


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pOrN iS GoOD foR yOu guYZ trUsT mE


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general food thread, I suppose
question: Is milk, cheese, butter completely comped due to the hormones they pump the cows full of? Or do the benefits of these foods outweigh that poison?
Replies: >>1236 >>1491
>>1216 (OP) 
My opinion is that you should "Buy it from sources you 'know' they dont' fuck with it,". In the US, anything that is 'certified organic' isn't fucked with, but that "certified" part drives the price up because certifications are a bureaucratic extra.

As for food being fucked with, here's what I've heard (USA-based info):

>Coffee
Mass-produced coffee (Foldgers, maxwell house, etc) is typically overcooked as fuck. the "dark" or "french roast" stands for "fucking charred to inedible bullshit,". The best coffee I've ever had was from a local brewer in a tourist-trap type-town. Our city also has several roasters, but for some reason one is run by a hippie who allows his workers to work barefoot, and another I stopped going to because they openly joined the woke club two years ago. 

>Grain-foods and oats
Heard something about machine oils and chemicals leeching into it because "factory conditions". Don't know much else. When in doubt, buy in bulk from local sources or find the versions that are unprocessed as possible.

>Meats
Years ago, I heardbig box stores putting sawdust into ground beef, not sure if it's like that now.

>Fish
Heard a rumor that big box stores were dyeing their salmon meat to make it look more appealing. 

>Milk and butter
If the concern is Bovine Growth Hormone and other shit like that. I would avoid big box stores (walmart, sam's club, costco), they're well up there for following profit creep and either putting shady shit in or cutting shit to get that new increase.

Butter and heavy cream are expensive anyway. which sucks, because it feels like butter never needed to be expensive.

>Chips
Not much I know about other than "consistently fucked and abused by The Grocery Shrink Ray". I heard some schizo-rumor about corn chips having some kind of fetus-based hormone that gets people addicted to them, but I think it more has to do with their own eating habits.

>Cheese
Block cheese is a lot less sketchy than shredded. It lasts longer too.

I don't know how to feel about the "American cheese is not actually cheese" thing. If we're talking about what cheese is technically defined as, then it's a cultured milk that has solidified into a hard state that can be melted at temperatures. and if it says has milk in it, then it's likely a real cheese. The question is "what the fuck is it when it isn't curdled milk?" calling it a "cheese product" is just disingenuous.

Also, for most cottage cheeses, you can actually let them go a few weeks past their date. heard that from a rando who worked in a dairy farm.

>Yogurt
In my opinion, grocery store yogurt sucks dick. Most of the ~$1.00 yogurt cups you see at grocery stores are basically flavorless fruit puddings with no probiotic benefits. Dannon is the worst, activia doesn't even have live cultures in it. Greek yogurt and skyr can be used as starter cultures for your own yogurt, but in general, thermophilic cultures yield a lot less actual yogurt per gallon of milk, and the store-bought ones get chalky and gross over time if you try to reculture them repeatedly.

Personally, I've been having great results with heirloom mesophilic yogurts. and when you culture those, you can keep some in the freezer as starter cubes, melt them in the fridge overnight, and then culture them throughout the day. Plus, what you put in as milk is what you get out as yogurt.

>Bread
Uncle Scooby really really 'really' doesn't like store-bought bread. I don't blame him either. Every bread I've made by hand, no matter if it's using grocery store ingredients is always at least ten times better than the crap bread you get in grocery stores. Maybe a proper baker's bread would be better but that gets pretty expensive if you're not baking it.

Speaking of bread, what's a good ratio of bread flour to ground-up oats for a more-fibrous bread?

>Other info
Look up "The Wolfe Pit" on youtube. He does a lot of good "trying shitty grocery store foods for the sake of views and science,", and recipes for those on shoestring budgets.
Replies: >>1241 >>1270
>>1236
>Heard a rumor that big box stores were dyeing their salmon meat to make it look more appealing. 
it's not a rumor, it says right on the package they add color to it
>>1236
>Heard a rumor that big box stores were dyeing their salmon meat to make it look more appealing. 
If that's what I think it is, it may not be as bad as you think. Salmon is pink because they eat krill which have a red chemical that builds up in the body. It's the same stuff that makes flamingos pink. Farmed salmon don't eat the same stuff as their wild brethren so farmers simply feed them the chemical instead.

>one is run by a hippie who allows his workers to work barefoot
That sounds awesome. I'd go there.

>Every bread I've made by hand, no matter if it's using grocery store ingredients is always at least ten times better than the crap bread you get in grocery stores
Every bread I've ever made has been absolute crap. It always has this weird sweet taste and I've never been able to figure out why.
Replies: >>1271
Something else I'd like to see sometime, is a post or infograph on how to use your meals to make vitamins obsolete.

>>1270
>That sounds awesome. I'd go there.
That shit drives my foodservice autism up the wall. Working around food, hot shit, or with tools and you don't have shoes? Just slipping on something is bad enough, what if you have something hot or sharp in your hands if you do?

>Farmed salmon don't eat the same stuff as their wild brethren so farmers simply feed them the chemical instead.
Yeah. I'm not a salmon-eater so I wouldn't know or care anyways.

>Every bread I've ever made has been absolute crap. It always has this weird sweet taste and I've never been able to figure out why.
If you don't have sugar or milk in your bread, then it could be the yeast that's making it taste weird. Yeast accounts for a huge chunk of the flavor of bread itself, the same principle works for beer too.
Replies: >>1281
What about using Ghee over butter? Any issues there?
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>>1271
>make vitamins obsolete
Eh?

>Working around food, hot shit, or with tools and you don't have shoes? Just slipping on something is bad enough, what if you have something hot or sharp in your hands if you do?
Fair enough. How much of an OHS nightmare it is depends on what sort of food they sell I suppose.
Replies: >>1313
>>1281
>Eh?
I should've elaborated.

What I mean by "obsoleting vitamins", is to discover meals that supplement nutritional needs without any sort of need to have or buy supplements or one-a-day-vitamins
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Do I need to consume any gay dairy shit? I cover fats w/ olive oil, peanut butter & avocados; cover proteins too w/ beef & pork.
Raw milk is the hwhite mans drink. Niggers and faggots hate it because they can't stomach it, jews try to suppress it because they hate everything that makes the hwhite man strong.
Replies: >>1339
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>>1323
Illegal to sell here. And all the beef is 43% corn fed at least.
I hate jews so much it's unreal.

At least this is one of the few things Weimerica seems to be superior at. They even have non-farmed salmon in some places.

I guess I have to start my own farm to feed myself.
Replies: >>1342 >>1345 >>1410
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A study on vitamin D3 in wild and farmed salmon: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31036792/ , to note:
>Content of vitamin D3 in the fillet from wild salmon caught in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea was significantly different (p < 0.05), being 18.5 ± 4.6 µg/100 g and 9.4 ± 1.9 µg/100 g, respectively. In the farmed salmon the content ranged from 2.9 ± 0.7 µg/100 g to 9.5 ± 0.7 µg/100 g.

How do you keep count of calories anyways? It seems meal preperation is obligatory, because that's the only way you'll be able to weight each ingredient and keep track of calories. You'd be using your kitchen scales every day of the week.

>>1339
>I guess I have to start my own farm to feed myself.
/hgm/ thread when? Can't trust kikes to get us decent food.
>>1339
>Illegal to sell here.
Just make friends with dairy farmers instead of being an atomized faggot. My neighbor gives me raw milk in trade for eggs. If you're a city slicker, find some muslims or get in on one of those shared ownership of a cow schemes that circumvent sale of raw milk laws.
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Has anyone considered going deliberately low protein? I got thinking of it when I started looking at how much money I'm spending on groceries and thought to myself
>shaolin monks used to basically just eat rice and vegetables
>can it be done?
It's not just them though, gladiators supposedly just ate a kind of gruel, and whenever I read about historical diets I'm fascinated by the supposed lack of protein. 
I suspect training would have to be adjusted though. Maybe more endurance focused? An argument could even be made for very low reps and a pure strength focus, since that might be less damaging overall.
Any ideas? I'm tired of spending more money on food than some spend on rent and I really don't want to go the ground beef route.
Replies: >>1401
>>1394
>I'm tired of spending more money on food than some spend on rent and I really don't want to go the ground beef route.

I think the idea would be less about "low protein" and more about "inexpensive protein". That said, here's where I'll start: 

1. Potatoes, Carrots, Onions, Beans, Rice, Lentils. All of these are inexpensive and easy to buy in bulk.
2. Beet(root), Turnips and Rutabaga/Swedes are underrated as fuck.
3. Look for a food-service store that allows non-member walk-ins. In the US, Gordon Food Service is such a store.
4. Around holidays, you can find bulk meat on sale. Pork shoulder can be 
5. Ethnic stores (asian/latino/indian) can have bulk spices (and food) for cheap prices.
6. If you got a food dehydrator, mushrooms will last surprisingly-long if dried to a crisp. Mushrooms can be surprisingly-cheap too.
7. If you're just looking to try some spices and not spend a fortune, TJMaxx has good selection of variety packs.
8. Avoid thinking that nutrition-facts labels are accurate. Quite a few fruits and veggies are under-counted for nutritional content.

>Gladiators supposedly just ate a kind of gruel, and whenever I read about historical diets I'm fascinated by the supposed lack of protein.
It's called puls, and found the recipe from the YT channel Tasting History. I managed to do a semi-recreation, It's actually decent, but it really is a bland dish, even with garlic and onions. 

For the record, plants -do- have protein in them, it's just that meats are more-typical for being a large source of protein. 

Puls - The food gladiators ate

This recipe is mostly a semi-modern adaptation of what gladiators ate, keep in mind, you can mess with this any way you want, I would add some chili powder, cumin, and either pork or chicken into this too.

'required ingredients'
--1/3 cup of ground-up wheat berries (ideally at a flour consistency). You can substitute this part with oats if you like.
--2/3 cup of water. (add milk if you want it creamier, use water if you want it historically-accurate)
--1/3 cup of beans (if dry, start this early and be mindful of how long it takes to cook beans)
--1 small onion (~3 oz or 83 g. Size not really determinate) 
--2 garlic cloves (or 1 teaspon of garlic powder/dried garlic)
--1 tablespoon of olive oil

'cooking instructions
--chop up onion and garlic, keep both separate.
--heat up olive oil in a pot and sear onions until they start to caramelize.
--when the onions got that good caramel look, toss the garlic in there, and mix it up.
--after ten seconds, add the flour or oats. stir while sear for ten seconds.
--add water, and beans if they are done.
--mix up and cook until they're either the consistency of pudding, or to whatever thickness you desire. Keep in mind to stir every few seconds so you don't get burnt crud on the bottom of the pan/pot.
--transfer to bowl, get utensils, and enjoy your meal.
Replies: >>1403 >>1409
>>1401
Thanks, solid post.
Replies: >>1409
>>1403
>>1401
I have to make an addendum to this recipe: If you're using ground-up wheat berries, use a FULL cup of liquid, not 2/3 cup.

Cook it low and keep stirring, otherwise it will clump up fast.
>>1339
>illegal
Buy it for pets retard
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Replies: >>1461 >>1462
>>1460
>This shit is actually rom last year
>He actually fucking would rather eat literal dog-chow-tier monkey food because it's cheaper than real fucking food.

I know inflation is getting out of fucking control, but how fucking schizo do you have to be to do this shit? You're better off making a fucking hoover stew, or other great depression foods than eating fucking animal food.

Besides, from what I've heard? Most shit that's food for animals is stored in places that are WAY FUCKING DIRTIER than what it's prepared for humans. Like if it was chicken for humans? it would be stored in a clean fridge. For animals? A literal hole in the ground.

Fuck antifa and their fucking food-store sabotage, fuck the wallstreet fags manipulating prices so they can get their narcissistic power highs. And fuck eating literal kibble.
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>>1460
>monkey chow
Isn't this on the same length as WEF-tier bug diets? He's eating enough estrogen in a day to be lactating twice as much as a dairy cow a month from now.
The Internet has gone a hard way to warp everyone's ability to rub two neurones together. Does he really believe, did that diet work on a gorilla, that his stomach works the same as a large herbivore?
It does make me ponder; where are levelheaded people? Do men nowadays value knowledge passed by memes that much more over what common sense can tell us?
Replies: >>1464 >>1465
>>1462
it's probably just a joke
plus the dude who made the image probably dumped all common-sense posts
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>>1462
>Does he really believe, did that diet work on a gorilla, that his stomach works the same as a large herbivore?
that's an extremely valid point. I actually believe that gorillas ferment the food in their stomach after they eat it. It's a completely different method to what humans use to eat it. I would be willing to bed that one of the reasons why he even looks like that at the end is because his body was not properly digesting the gorilla food and thus getting less nutrients. Also, I'm willing to bet he cut out a lot of process sugars and empty carbs when eating the gorilla food. It's maybe comparable to consuming a protein shake that is intended to stave off hunger so the person drinking it doesn't snack. From the images he's posting, provided they're real do show "success" there are much more easier and manageable ways to get there. I don't think I could bring myself to eat literal animal food to bulk unless I was in survival situation. 

However, instead of focusing on this darkest gorilla nigger we have ever seen, let's talk about cheap, non-meat protein sources that aren't soy. I'll start, fresh, garden grown green beans. I grew some last year and they were great! I actually have more seeds left and I will probably plant them more this year. However if you don't have room for that or can't tend a garden, then I would advise you consider trying butter beans. I live in the south so they're pretty common in my area. unfortunately, they have a fairly high carb amount for what they are but it's not the same kind of carbs you'd get from eating candy or processed bread.
Replies: >>1466 >>1491
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>>1465
>green beans
Do you mean French beans? Are you saying they have the protein value of the soy bean, without the estrogen?
Are there more plants that share the proteinic value of the beans? I believe other plants tied with masculinity, like the spinach or the onion, are so because of their content in metals and valuable vitamins, but are there any other plants that contain as much protein?
I seriously hope no one ever takes that screencap seriously
Replies: >>1467
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>>1466
>Do you mean French beans? Are you saying they have the protein value of the soy bean, without the estrogen?
No, actually. That's not what I meant to say. I was trying to suggest non-meat protein sources that weren't soy. Also, I apologize for not being more specific of the green beans I grew. I grew chinese long beans, image related. They came out really well. None of the images are mine but you get the idea. I am pretty certain my plans produced well over 20 pounds of beans over the season. I forgot how man i planted, probably around 6 or 7?
Replies: >>1468
>>1467
which begs the questions, what other plants are great for their protein value?
Replies: >>1470 >>1483
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>>1468
I know that onions are good for that kind of thing. Funny that you mention that, I would make a stir fry of onions and green beans and it came out pretty well. I also think peanuts are a pretty good source of protein. They're also high in healthy fats and fairly easy to grow. It's actually rather interesting we call them pea"NUTS". They're not technically a part of nut family like almonds and walnuts  but instead are a part of the legume family. So much so that they grow in the ground, much like potatoes. In fact, most legumes do.
Replies: >>1472
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>>1470
>nuts
I don't knnnow in what way nuts would be useful for gaining mass if I were to make a diet on them. They are generally pricey and they can hardly be cooked into anything. So I generally eat them raw, which again works mostly as a snack rather than an actual meal/sidemeal.
And about onions, they were high on proteins? Thought they had metals, vitamins or something else, like the spinach is rich in iron. I know my grandfather always eats plenty of raw onions, and I know him to work consistently hard on the countryside, even well into his 80's. Absolutaly respectable I would say.
Replies: >>1474
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>>1472
>nuts
Anon, my post was about peanuts, which are legumes. Here is the nutritional of peanuts. Also, yeah you're right. Onions are more valuable for their other metals and vitamins. Another thing they're good for is adding flavor to meats and even other vegetables as I mentioned with the green beans and onions stir fry.
>>1468
I am also curious about this, considering how fucked inflation is right now buying meat is about to get a lot harder and i am also about to be unemployed, beans are dirt fucking cheap but I don't know what their ratio in protein/fat/carbs is to a lean steak. i've been doing leangains since January with good results (-25lbs of fat) but it has a very specific diet regimen that I don't want to throw off.
>>1465
>>1216 (OP) 
Any beans will work as a cheap proteins, so do oats.

This is relevant to my interests, because I need your help with a recipe /fit/.

I'm trying to figure out a "barebones almost-beef bean burger" recipe that has the non-mandatory ingredients omitted (meaning, I can add whatever the fuck I want to it within reason, without being afraid of fucking it up.).

Youtube and reddit are usually decent for recipes, but I'm losing my mind getting fucking drowned in recipes that are either vegan trash or add way too fucking many things. Fuck. Even if I add minus tags to reduce the utter hell of shitty search results,  I FUCKING STILL get recipes that just feel like there's far too much non-mandatory bullshit even if it says "simple" in the recipe.


Here's what I do know bean burgers need
*** Of course, beans. from what I've seen, any variety that exists in a can can be pureed for burgers, even chickpeas. It just needs to go through the usual bean-cooking process.
*** Something to keep it stable but mushy enough to shape it before you bake it.
*** Flavors (which as for the barebones part, these will be added in on a per-cook basis, and in this recipe are omitted)

The second is where I'm having trouble trying to figure out what to use for the absolute minimum of bean burgers. There are four things I've seen in recipes that makes sense as being part of binders/stabilizers:

-Eggs
-Flour
-Oats
-Breadcrumbs

Eggs act as a binder, I know that because that and butter is how it works with cookies. Flour, oats and breadcrumbs both are starchy and that both adds volume and binding. The thing is, I don't know 'which ones are strictly-required vs optional'.

for the "almost beef" part, I plan on making some of this and using some to cook the beans with: https://y.com.sb/watch?v=2fE5KzvOZRk
Alternatively you could just make this and cook the beans in it: https://y.com.sb/watch?v=X9TV44kHgbY

Additionally, for more beef flavor, I plan on mixing some beef fat in the burgers, and maybe even shred the beef shank's meat to use as more filler. Otherwise I plan to use some beef fat I have saved in the fridge, and use the shank meat to make potted beef.

I found out, that certain discount grocery stores sell beef bones and suet for FAR cheaper than the walmart-equivalents. Like, I feel legitimately ripped off by the wal-mart-like, it was that much difference.
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